RSS

Blog

Camping Chili Recipe

Chili Recipe

After some carefully research I have combined every camping chile recipe on the internet and created the following infographic.  

Camping Chili Recipe

Here is a pdf version for easy printing

 

Below is the same information with a couple of embellishments.

 

Throw the following in a pot, bring to a boil and then simmer for 30 minutes.

Meat

one pound of cooked ground meat (beef, chicken, turkey, pork, venison or other or maybe in  combination. if it is greasy meat, drain it. If you are a vegetarian you can skip the meat part and add an extra can of beans.

A Cooked Onion

Chop (1) onion and cook it up in some oil. If the meat you chose is fatty, you can cook the onion and the meat together. Use a large onion if like onions and a medium one if you are not a big fan. Optionally you can also chop and cook a poblano pepper, a green pepper or a bell pepper (but not a doctor pepper). This would also be a good place to mince and cook up 2 to 4 cloves of garlic if you like garlic.

Beans

Add  (2) 15 oz cans from the following List.

Kidney Beans

Pinto Beans

Black Beans

Chili Beans

Pork and Beans

Ranch Style Beans

Lima Beans

Garbanzo Beans (chick-peas)

Cannellini Beans

Great Norther Beans

Almost any Bean Really.

Corn (ok not a bean, but still fibrous)

Some people drain and rinse the beans, while others don’t. It’s chili so you really can’t go too wrong

Tomatoes

To the pot add 1 or 2 Cans of Stewed Tomatoes, or diced tomatoes or tomato Soup or tomato paste or ketchup if you are really in a tomato bind.

Spices

2 tsp to 2 tbs of chili powder

1 to 2 tsps of cumin

Additional Optional spices

2 tsp Sugar

Salt and Pepper to Taste

1/2 tsp Oregano

1 tsp Paprika

Garlic Powder

Spicy But Not Spices...

Chopped Jalapeno

1 Small Can Green Chili

 

if it look too thick to boil, add a little water... or a can of Beer.

 

Accessories

Serve Chili  Over

Rice

Spaghetti

Corn Chips

Top  Chilli With

Shredded Cheese

Sour Cream

Serve Chili With

Saltines

Corn Bread

Cooler Corn Infographic

Cooler Corn is a great way to make a lot of corn on the cob. I like it so much I made a how to infographic... Enjoy!

 

Do You want a a PDF version for easy printing?  Cooler Corn Instructions PDF

Camp Dish Cleanup The 5 Step / 3 Tub Method

Edit July 11th 2014 .. See the Infographic Here .. I also shorterd the text, but same basic idea.

 There are many ways to clean camp dishes, some more effective than others. Some people are fine with making them look clean, but I try and be a bit fastidious in my camp dish cleanup. Maybe I have an out of proportion fear of dysentery, but the following method is health department approved.

 Washing the dishes themselves is a 5 step process. Pre-Wash, Wash, Rinse, Sterilize and Dry.

 The Following equipment and Supplies are required

  • (3) Wash Tubs

  • Water

  • Hot water

  • Soap

  • Sanitation chemicals

  • Scrub brush and/or a sponge

Step 1 Pre-Wash

The first step is to scrape off as much excess food and grease as possible. The reason for this is to make the  wash water in the next step  last as long as possible. Sticking dirty dishes directly into the clean wash water just creates dirty wash water.

Step 2 Wash

In a wash tub or bucket of soapy warm water clean off all the remaining food residue and grease. Do not move onto the next step until it is clean. shake as much soapy water as possible and move on to the next step.

Step 3 Rinse

In a second tub of hot water is for rinsing off the remaining soap.

Step 4 Sanitize

The third wash tub is to sanitize your dishes. A solution of chlorine bleach (1 tbs per gallon) or other sanitizing agents (such as steramine) in any temperature water. Soak  for 1 minute. You can use Boiling hot water to sanitize but that is trickier and a little more dangerous.

Step 5 Dry

If possible air dry your dishes. If you are in a hurry and don’t have time to air dry use paper towels. Do NOT use your dirty dish towel, that will just spread a nice coating of bacteria all over your freshly cleaned dishes. A mesh bag that you can hang up that holds your clean dishes and pots is very helpful.

Step 6 Clean Up the Clean Up

After you are done washing the dishes you must clean up from the clean up. First take the wash water and strain out all the food bits and dispose of them in the trash. Dispose of the water by broadcasting is over a wide area, 200 feet from your camp and any river or lake. Take the rinse water, pour it in the wash tub, rinse it around and then broadcast it as above. Pour the contents of the sanitization tub  into the rinse  tub and then let it sit for a minute. Then pour the sanitation solution from the rinse tub to the wash tub and let it sit again for one minute.  Once again broadcast the sanitization water. Let the tubs air dry.

Other Helpful Hints

* Clean your dishes form cleanest to dirties.. save that greasy bacon fry pan till last, because once you are done with that, your dishwater will have to be replaced.

* Use a Biodegradable soap such as Camp Suds. A little goes a long way.

Open Country 5 Cup Percolator Video

We did not make this video, but we could not have done it better.

To clear up some (or add too the) confusion, this will make five "cups of coffee." A cup of coffee is usually defined as starting with 6 fluid ounces of cold water and ending up with  around five plus ounces of brewed coffee.  For most other purposes (recipes etc.) a cup  is defined as eight fluid ounces, at least in the USA. (then there is the Imperial cup, but we are not going there today).

 

Our First Video.

A little stop action fun! It shows all the camping cooking gear that can fit in a Camping Kitchen Box. 

 

Camping Kitchen Check List

Here is everything you may want to consider when you provision your camping kitchen. You may not need everything, but you don't want to forget anything!

Equipment

Pots and Pans

Cooking Utensils

  • Turner (Spatula)
  • Serving Spoon
  • Slotted Spoon
  • Grilling Fork
  • Ladle
  • Whisk
  • Tongs
  • Skewers
  • Can Opener
  • Bottle Opener
  • Cork Screw
  • Mixing Bowls
  • Measuring Cups
  • Measuring Spoons
  • Cutting Boards
  • Chef Knife
  • Paring Knife
  • Grater
  • Vegetable Peeler

Serving

Cleanup

  • Dish Pans
  • Dish Drainer / Dish Towel / Mesh Bag
  • Pot Scrubber

Other Equipment

  • Stove
  • Table Cloth
  • Coolers
  • Flashlight / Headlight / Latern
  • Notebook and Pen / Pencil

Consumables

Staple Foods

  • Seasoning
    • Salt
    • Pepper
    • Onion Powder
    • Garlic powder
    • Cinnamon
    • etc
  • Cooking oil /Cooking Spray
  • Coffee, Tea, Hot Chocolate
  • Sugar
  • Creamer
  • Baking Powder
  • Backing Soda
  • Ketchup
  • Mustard
  • Mayo

Supplies

  • Aluminium Foil
  • Paper Towels
  • Trash Bags
  • Ziplock bags, assorted sizes.
  • Matches / Lighter
  • Dish Soap
  • Scrubbing Pad
  • Sponge
  • Cooking Fuel (White Gas, Propane, Wood, Charcoal, Lighter Fluid)
  • Bleach or other sanitizer
Nesting Nirvana

The secret to happily packed camping cooking gear? Nesting! We here at the Camping Kitchen Box have spent a lot of time thinking about the optimal camp cooking gear, and how to pack it.  One of the best way to save space is to have gear that nests.

The nestsing camping cookware  makes it easy to pack your chuck box .  Below are some of the multitude of possible nesting combination of the Open Country Cookware and other accessories.

The 5 Cup Perk nested in the 2 quart pot which is nested in the 4 Quart pot which is nested in the 10 Quart pot

The 5 Cup Perk nested in the 2 quart pot which is nested in the 4 Quart pot which is nested in the 10 Quart pot

10 Inch and 8 Inch Pans with Folding Handles

The 10 Inch Pan and 8 Inch Pans have handles that fold and the 8 inch snuggles inside the 10 inch.

 

Camping Pots and Pans in a washtub

Here the 10 quart pot sits in the 10 inch fry pan (with its handle half unfurled)  both inside a Sterilite 12 Quart wash pan.

Carefully Nested Camping Posts and Pans

Here we have the pans resting on the pots, which are  nested in the wash bin, which is nested in our rectangular colander ...

 

Nested Post and Pans in a Plastic Chuck Box

And of course the logical conclusion... everything neatly fitting in the camping kitchen box.

 

What is a Chuck Box?

What is a chuck box? A chuck box is a dedicated box that carries your camping kitchen gear in an organized fashion. Having your gear organized has several advantages. First if you have a dedicated Camping Kitchen Box (Chuck Box or Grub Box, or Patrol Box (as the Boy Scouts call it) ) loaded up with your camp kitchen gear, your packing for your next adventure is already half done. A proper chuck box is not just a box though. It should have dedicated shelves and drawers that keep your camp kitchen gear organized and easy to access.

What makes The Camping Kitchen Box different then a typical chuck box? The first standout feature is its weight. Traditional chuck boxes are made from plywood. depending on the construction method used, and the thickness of the plywood, these boxes can way anywhere from 30 to 60 or more lbs. empty. The unladen Camping Kitchen Box weights 12 pounds (less then 1 stone). That extra weight makes a big difference.

Another outstanding feature of the Camping Kitchen Box is it's layout. It was designed to accommodate certain critical pieces of equipment. The first piece of equipment is your stove. The CKB stove compartment will easily swallow most standard 2 burner propane or white gas stoves, with room to spare for a griddle. The second piece of equipment that some chuck boxes ignore, because it is just not glamorous is the the wash tub. The CKB will easy fit a standard 12 quart dishpan (or three) , so you can properly keep clean up after your meals.

Finally the Camping Kitchen Box features 2 Large drawers so you can really organize your cooking utensils and other small items that would normally get lost at the bottom of a large tub or cardboard box.